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20121121
20121121
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
and local platforms, whether it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfe
occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the next nightmare scenario, but we can better prepare ourselves every day with the activities you are taking on now. i thank you in advance for the family, the child, the son, the daughter, who has no idea that their life is going to be uprooted by catastrophe within the confines of the san francisco bay area or perhaps in a western pacific nation or in africa or south america. i thank you in advance for the good work you are going to do. because there's going to come a point, be it an ert quake, be it a tsunami, be it a man-made heinous terrorist catastrophe, that makes a large group of people feel helpless and feel hopeless. your efforts today, your passion, your commitment, your desire to make a difference, will give help and give hope to those people. it may be your family or it may be a family across the world. it is what we do, it is what you do and i'm proud to count myself among you. so i thank you i
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
lists of policies and often their wish lists of policies, after hurricane katrina there was a meeting at the heritage foundation just two weeks after the storm hit. parts of the city were still under water and there was a meeting and "the wall street journal" reported from it and the heading was 31 free market solutions for hurricane katrina and you go down the list and it was -- don't re-open the public schools. replace the public schools with vouchers and drill for oil in anwar and the arctic national wild life reserve and what kind of free market solutions are these? here you have a crisis that was created by a collision between heavy weather which may or may not have been linked to climate change and what climate change looks like and colliding with weak infrastructure because of years and years of neglect. let's get rid of the infrastructural together and drill for the oil which is the root cause of climate change. that's their shock doctrine, and i think it's time for people shock. >> people shock? >> which we've had before, if you think about 1929 and the market shock and the w
inspired as i watched this council hold hearings in the wake of hurricane katrina to talk about plans on how to integrate people with disabilities into the emergency plans. and to be part of the mayor's office of disability. and be part of the disability disaster preparedness movement. we have appreciated your leadership, your institutional knowledge. many times over the years as i heard the council hearing cases i see you make that connection to another hearing that was held maybe a year or two before, and seeing the larger picture really of what we are trying to accomplish here in san francisco. i wish you the best with love, with good speed. we hope to hear from you soon. congratulations. >> thank you very much. thank you. >> jewels, i've only known you a few short months. i don't know you as well as i would like. however, i have observed of thing or two. you move through the world with an elegance and style that is impressive. your eloquent and passionate. i listen when you speak i want to thank you for the experience of working with you. >> thank you very much. it means a
people who are familiar with their struggle. survivors or of hurricane katrina. a group of students and teachers traveled to mississippi to help clean up debris. they will be spending the entire week there including the thanksgiving holiday. the volunteers say lots of people came and helped them after hurricane katrina hit their community and they just want to return the favor. >>> time now 6:41. if you do your holiday shopping online, you are being warned this morning. why the police say be very careful about how your packages are delivered. >>> we're live in san francisco where arson investigators are having three burned out cars towed away to inspect them to figure out if somebody deliberately set them on fire. >>> good morning. it's very slow and tough driving out there. we've had a a lot of accidents and a lot of single car crashes. we'll tell you where the traffic trouble spots are when we come back with the morning news. >>> most of rain is winding down. there is still light rain around. little hit and miss showers around marin county and san mateo coast. but kind of cloudy,
hurricane katrina to help individuals and businesses as well as the local government. let's talk about that legislation and the timetable. how fast are you looking to get this done? >> we're going try to get this done within the next three months, tom. i think it's very critical that we move. the moves have been great so far with bipartisan efforts with the governor and the president of the united states. i'm very hopeful about this. yesterday's meeting was trying to solidify the group so that we know we're going to have a tough battle getting any legislation through. i'm already working with three or four members on ways and means committee who know quite well, first of all, fema does not really cover except for loans, low-interest loans, the business community. these guys and gals are hurting out there, small businesses. we've got to get some form of tax deduction so that they can make themselves whole again. we want to keep people in business. second of all, home -- the homes. tremendous damage. there's a point beyond which insurance doesn't cover. we should provide that. that's wha
on those contingencies. but we look at the national response framework. it was rewritten post katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat,
of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pendleton depending on your deployment cycle what fleet week can bring to bear. and we need to find a way, perhaps dcl, north palm being the broker of that, to maintain a better capabilities database so we know what is immediately available because under our old constructs, if we needed additional help in the national guard in
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
who are very familiar with their struggle. survivors of hurricane katrina. the group of students and typers from mississippi traveled north to new jersey this week to help clean up debris and rebuild homes. it will -- they will be spendge the entire week there including the thanksgiving holiday. the volunteers say a lot of people came and helped them after hurricane katrina hit their community so they just want to return the favor. >> great story, tori. >>> 78:24. there's a new survey of berkeley high school students suggesting that fewer students are taking weapons to school or they are coming to campus under the influence of drugs and alcohol. 0% of juniors reported taking a weapon to school this year. that's down from 15%. the number of 11th graders coming to school under the influence of alcohol and marijuana, that also fell to 35% down from 55% in 2008. >>> all right. 8:24. want to check in with sal. see what's happening on 880 in oakland. >>> you know a lot of people use that to get to the airport in oakland. we also checked in with the airport parking. so far it's not comp
want to look at sandy and katrina. because we were lucky, i made this chart before we went on. and turns out the estimate was exactly right. if you have that graphic, i don't know if you have that graphic. let's see if you have that graphic. i'm holding here for five, four, maybe not. what it shows is that there it is, that's katrina in the blue, and that's sandy in the green. you can see the pop there and it's come down. so another week of elevated jobless claims would be normal here. continuing claims too early, that's a week behind to show up here. so we're right in the range of where you would expect to be if sandy was an event along the lines of katrina. next thing is this sentiment number. you had courtney on talking about holiday christmas sales. i want to do a pre-christmas consumer check-up on their finances. i don't know if you remember. maybe you don't, unemployment a year ago, what was the number? >> a year ago we were -- >> like a point higher. >> 9%, .1%. most of the metrics you might care about appear to have moved in the right direction for the consumer going i
, swiss re actually warned us of an east coast storm like sandy in 2006. after hurricane katrina, swiss re's head of catastrophe perils, andy castaldi, worried aloud about warming seas and more violent storms in the gulf. but, he told me: >> i'm also concerned about the new york bay and long island would be inundated by a flood, due to a category 3 storm. a storm surge could completely flood the airport at jfk. 13 feet of sea water is not out of or to 17 feet is not out of the question. >> reporter: so the blue is sandy's storm surge. we interviewed castaldi again last week, after sandy. >> that's the footprint of the storm surge that was produced by the superstorm sandy, as you can see in the center of the screen is john f. kennedy airport. now i'm going to toggle back to the coastal flood map that we had prior to the storm and you can see just about the same areas as the sandy footprint we knew was exposed to a storm surge. >> reporter: six years ago, you said that you thought that climate change was a major factor in recent storm activity. do you think that more today? >> i can't really
? for hurricane katrina, they changed their estimation procedures to attempt to control for the fact businesses were closed so they weren't getting respondents as a result of closed businesses. after katrina, you had a sharp decline in payrolls. actually, negative after a trend or 200,000 a month. so if it's anything similar to that, then i would expect to see a soft jobs number next month, but the idea is to look past that, right? we know it's a temporary bias. it doesn't necessarily tell us anything about the underlying trend in the economy and you'll get a reversal on the subsequent months after the downward buys from the hurricane. >> but i just wonder if we work our way into december and people are on vacation and not as attuned to the news as they are in other part os the year, but if there's no agreement in washington and if sandy results in noise issy numbers that are bearish, there's a chance you might be revising some expectations in the next month, no? >> and you're right. even though we know there's bias and distortions to the data, it's hard to quantify that. you have this worry th
came to new orleans after katrina and bringing the super bowl to that town at that time was a remarkable achievement and new orleans people love him for what he gives back to the city. >> love him, the fact that he just became emotional talking about the war heroes and that he can talk so candidly about his mark. most people try to hide that stuff. i can't wait to see it. >> up can see the entire interview and our interview with sean penn and alicia keys. >> holidays are coming. thanksgiving is tomorrow. there are bound to be some awkward social moments at your thanksgiving dinner. columnive phillip >>> let me show you how it's done. dad how about a little percussion. tap, tap. mom, high hat. good, mom. excellent. and engineer rirksjerry, on the kick drum. come, come come. on the kick drum. come come. go. and jerry in the house. come come. with the kick drum. >> i'm just not a kick drum kind of guy. i rather be a listener. >> that awkward moment comes from "the breakup." we got "new york times" columnist phil galanes to help us get through this holidays. h
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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